Book Excerpt – Winning Like Sachin by Devendra Prabhudesai
Article / April 26, 2018

A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself. – Joseph Campbell   The book 'Winning Like Sachin' showcases and illustrates the various attributes of that make Sachin Tendulkar the role model, n Read the excerpt from the 5th chapter of the book. (To buy, Winning Like Sachin at the best price, click here.) DO WHAT YOU DO BEST… The fact that Sachin scored over 1,000 runs in both forms of the game in the calendar year of 1997 did nothing to dispel the claims of his detractors that he had not been batting at his best while leading. On 2 January 1998, he underwent the mortification of learning from the media that he was no longer the captain. Any lesser mortal in his position could have sulked and brooded for days, but Sachin chose to handle the situation by reminding himself of who he was. He tackled the situation by returning to his roots and making up his mind to concentrate on doing what he did best. While he had done all that he could to turn things around for his team as a captain, he had never been obsessed with that role. What he loved over and above…

Book Excerpt – Mahatma on The Pitch by Kausik Bandyopadhyay
Article / September 29, 2017

Did Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi ever play cricket?

Were there any connections between Gandhi and cricket during the high tide of national movement? 

The book, Mahatma on The Pitch, tries to find answers to these apparently quirky questions by exploring the untold relationship between Mahatma Gandhi, and Indian cricket.

Read the excerpt from the 3rd chapter of the book.

7 reasons we’ll never forget Malgudi
Article / October 21, 2016

The name Malgudi evokes a nostalgic response in almost anyone you meet. Somehow it seems to bring about memories of a simpler, less complicated era in our lives, so much so that even Indians who've never experienced village life firsthand feel as though 'Malgudi' might be their 'native village'! Advertisers for quite a few products now use 'Malgudi' and its associations to help brand their products – fruit juice, restaurants, home-stays for tourists… Just why do we all collectively love Malgudi so much? Could be any or all of these reasons. 1. The travails of the common man. Most of R.K.Narayan's stories were extremely simple, and had simple plots – an ordinary person, most often a young boy or man, would be jolted out of his peaceful existence through no fault of his own, and be forced to grapple with problems that were obviously too complex for him. Somehow, he would emerge from the experience, not gloriously successful but not a complete failure either. There were no heroic characters. These could well be tales about the author's brother's equally popular creation, the Common Man. 2. The wry sense of humour. Feeling nostalgic? Here's the famous Malgudi Days theme song: While…